Meet and greet one direction tickets 2014 ukrainian

Ukraine – Travel guide at Wikivoyage

meet and greet one direction tickets 2014 ukrainian

VIP Nation is a service that provides premium concert ticket packages online. Ultimate VIP and VIP packages were available for One Direction tour dates in North America. VIP package items, including ticket, are distributed the night of the show by the VIP Nation host. Buy One Direction tickets from the official propagacni.info site. Find One Direction tour schedule, concert details, reviews and photos. Wandering off or travelling without a tour can result in fines and radiation in and should not be considered a part of Ukraine for travel purposes. .. Alternatively, one can travel from eastern Hungary to Ukraine by a local train on a .

E-tickets will be sent to your email. A customer service officer may be contacted by SKYPE do not wait until adding you as friend, just send a message and wait for a reply. The website is designed mainly for the purchase of tickets between cities in different regions and also tickets for international trains departing from Ukraine.

ID document is required upon boarding. You do not have to print a ticket purchased online however it's betterbut you must have it at least on your smartphone. Tickets purchased online can be refunded. Tickets for travel within region are also available but that will be just buying a segment ticket of inter-region train - they are more expensive and usually take more time. So to travel from City 1 of region A to City 2 of region A it is suggested to go to local train station to buy a ticket.

While these tickets within same region may be available for purchase only in person ID document is not requiredthe schedule is available online in English language here: Another way to find routes between two exact stations of all routes that go through the exact station: From the other side, they are punctual, reliable and very cheap EUR For example, a journey from Lviv to Kyiv about km will cost you: Generally, in Ukraine, for long distance the train is preferred over the bus because of their comfort and because often they are even cheaper and safe.

The "Lux" sleeping cars have a two-berth cabin.

meet and greet one direction tickets 2014 ukrainian

Second class has cabins with four berths. Third class has six berths through which the aisle passes. Because trains are popular in Ukraine you might have to buy the tickets in advance. This is more often the case for third class. You can check availability and even buy tickets online at Ukrainian Railways e-shop website [2].

It is available in English, Russian and Ukrainian. The e-shop offers both domestic and international CIS only tickets starting in Ukraine. You can choose the desired train, the seat s and buy the ticket s online. Please also note that depending on the selected train the tickets may be of different types.

Some of them with QR code could just be printed or saved to your smartphone, whereas the other ones with barcode should be exchanged at the railway station's cash desk before boarding the train. By car[ edit ] It is possible to get around in Ukraine by car, but one must be aware of certain particulars: The signs are mostly in Ukrainian Cyrillic alphabet only.

Only major highways are equipped with signs written also in the Latin alphabet including village namesthe rest of the roads have only Cyrillic signs with a few signs written in the Latin alphabet indicating main cities. The best option is using GPS navigator. You can also have a good road map those available are mainly in Ukrainian, but Latin alphabet maps are starting to appear because place names aren't well posted on road signs.

You are strongly advised to respect the signs, especially speed limits. Be aware that unlike in Western countries, where limits are repeated several times, in Ukraine, an obligation or a prohibition is often indicated on a single sign, which you must not miss.

meet and greet one direction tickets 2014 ukrainian

And even these signs are often far off the road, covered by branches, etc. The police are always there to remind you. People usually drive faster anyway in a reckless manner. However, this will be changed in the nearest future, so it's advised to keep the speed limits.

The poor average quality of the roads already acts as a speed checker. Fuel is no longer a problem in Ukraine, especially for those who remember travelling to Ukraine during the early s, when petrol was considered precious. Today, there are plenty service stations.

There are varying types of fuel, such as diesel, unleaded 95 octane, and more rarely unleaded 98 octane; one finds also 80 and 76 octane. Note that if you choose to fill-up in a rural filling station, you will need to pay first, and in cash. Even there many stations do accept credit cards, however. The prices are slightly cheaper comparing to neighbouring EU countries, but more expensive, comparing to Russia.

The state of the roads is a huge subject: The main roads are OK for all cars, as long as you don't go too fast. Numerous running repairs have created a patchwork road surface, and it will seriously test your suspension - even on the major dual carriageways.

Secondary roads are passable, but beware: Roads between villages are often little more than dirt tracks and not metalled. Road works have been ongoing, but the quality of the roads is shy of Western Europe with the exception of Kyiv. The lighting in small towns and rural areas is poor or not-existing, so it's better avoid night driving, especially on secondary roads. Be careful when driving in towns or villages. Sometimes animals prefer to walk on the road, and they are a hazard for all drivers.

You're likely to see plenty of animals hit by cars, so be prepared Bicycle traffic is not very common, but you will sometimes see an aged man transporting a sack of grass on an old road-bike or a cycling enthusiast in bright clothes riding a semi-professional racing bike. Those are even more likely to be met on well-maintained roads where the pavement is smooth. Also cyclists will use both lanes of the road in both directions equally ie you are just as likely to meet a cyclist coming towards you, riding on the verge, as you will travelling in your direction.

Also, don't be surprised to see plenty of horse drawn carts - even on the dual carriageways. If in doubt, it's best to not drive at all, as many drivers in Ukraine do not comply with laws and drive often recklessly, often causing fatal accidents for foreigners and locals alike.

Corruption[ edit ] Until a few years ago, corruption among police officers was a major concern in Ukraine. However, since the Euromaidan demonstrations, the police service has been completely reformed and modernised: All police officers wear body cameras to monitor their performance, the footage of which is uploaded to social media and even broadcast on a local reality show!

When you are stopped for speeding or other offences, it is now extremely unlikely that you'll face bribery, however, this still might be possible. If you're asked about "reductions" if you pay on the spot, demand a written ticket for you to pay later instead.

Don't let them intimidate you. It's very useful to have an embassy phone number handy for these cases. If you mention that, they'll let you off the hook quicker than you know it. By bus[ edit ] There are two major bus companies that run buses from all of the major cities to and from Kyiv: The major advantage that the bus service has, is that it leaves from Boryspil [3] and stops in Kyivso if your destination is not Kyivits easier then taking a bus to the Main Passenger Railway Station [4] in Kyiv.

They are standard coach buses, serve cold drinks and tea, show movies, and make a stop about every hours. After some 50 metres there is an ATM right-hand! That's important because train tickets can be bought only in hryvnya and there is neither an exchange point nor an ATM nor the possibility to pay by credit card on the train station!

The men who go to Ukraine looking for a wife then fly home alone and broke

Go ahead and before the rail-road crossing turn left. There is one train a day to Lviv in the late afternoon. You must be in a vehicle. Coming from Poland by bicycle in August a cyclist only has to wait about 5 minutes to flag down a driver who was willing and had space to take him, a bicycle, and a full cycle touring kit. The actually crossing then took about an hour or so. There was no charge by the driver or the immigration officials. You might also be able to skip the car queue and go straight to the checkpoint.

Ubla is for pedestrians and cyclists only and Uzhorod for cars only. You can, however, get into someone's car just to cross the border. There is one rail border crossing Chop. There are also few daily buses from Michalovce to Uzhorod.

Uzhorod has a night train connection to Lviv and Odessa. Another good option could be to use the combined bus and railway connection from Prague Czech Republic to Uzhorodwhich is provided by the Czech railway company Leo Express. The bus mostly skips the long waiting times at the Ukrainian border. You can buy your tickets over the internet or via the company's app. There are also a lot of stops en route, which is handy if you're travelling from smaller Czech or Slovakian towns and rural areas.

Uzhorod is a great starting point for night train lines to the rest of Ukraine. Get around[ edit ] Be aware that all foreigners are subject to higher scrutiny by police when travelling on public transportation, especially intercity forms of it. If you are caught outside your base city without your official documents, be prepared for a big fine. The quickest way to get around big cities is the so-called marshrutka: You can generally flag them down or ask them to stop at places other than the specified bus stops.

The fare is paid as soon as you get in, and is fixed no matter how far you want to go. This is the same for the conventional buses, tram, trolley-buses and the Metro. Tell the driver that you want to get off when you are approaching the destination. Each city has an intercity bus station from which you can go pretty much anywhere in Ukraine. Fares and quality of service vary widely. By plane[ edit ] UIA offers cheap flights that can be booked on-line and can be a time-saving alternative.

However, be sure to book early for the cheapest fares. Train classes, coaches and ticket system are very similar to Russia and other CIS countries, see Russian train article. Ukrainian trains are quite old and slow by West European standards, and not very frequent, but they are punctual, reliable and very cheap. So for a mile journey with some half a dozen stops, the trains are averaging mph on straight level terrain - the Bullet Train it's not. Generally, in Ukraine, for long distance the train is preferred over the bus because of their comfort and because often they are even cheaper.

The "Lux" sleeping cars have a two-berth cabin.

Ukrainian revolution - Wikipedia

Second class are cabins with four berths. Third class have six berths through which the aisle passes. Advance online booking is highly recommended, firstly because some trains are popular and will sell out, secondly because it avoids having to negotiate your journey at a frenetic foreign railway station.

For timetables, prices and bookings visit Ukraine Railways or Ukrainian Railways e-shop these websites are in English, Russian and Ukrainian. Tickets with a little QR code icon should be printed off at home and are good to go. Other e-tickets are just a voucher which must be exchanged in advance for a ticket, at any mainline station in Ukraine. So don't buy such a ticket for a journey that starts outside Ukraine. Do this preferably an hour before departure, because close to departure of a long-distance express, the ticket area will become a frantic maul.

Large train stations may have dedicated counters for e-vouchers; eg Kiev does, while in Odessa any window will do. Either way, before queuing look out for the "technical break" times posted on each window. If you have to buy on the day, write your destination and train number on a piece of paper; desk clerks have little English or German. Large stations have big screens that show tickets available for the upcoming trains.

By bus[ edit ] There are two major bus companies that run buses from all of the major cities to and from Kiev: The major advantage of the bus service is that it leaves from Boryspil and stops in Kiev, so if your destination is not Kiev, its easier than taking a bus to the Main Passenger Railway Station in Kiev.

The buses are standard coach buses, serve cold drinks and tea, show movies, and make a stop about every hours. They run every few hours. Avtolux has a VIP bus to and from Odessa that has nice leather seats and is more less non-stop. It departs once a day, takes four hours or so both to and from Kiev and costs about UAH By Marshrutka[ edit ] Marshrutka in Lviv In addition, just as in Russia, there are private minibuses called Marshrutka. These run on fixed routes and may be licensed as either buses or taxis.

You can board one at the start of the route or at fixed stops. Some of them will also stop at any point between designated stops, but this largely depends on the region and even on the driver's mood. Officially, they are not supposed to drop passengers outside designated bus stops, but in reality they do it quite often.

At the start of the route and at fixed routes, you may find a queue you will have to stand in. At other places, just wave your hand when you see one. To get off, tell the driver when you reach your destination and he will stop.

You need to pay the amount of your fare to the driver.

Ukraine and the Maidan

You don't get a ticket, unless you ask for it. You can donate to help those who were wounded and killed in the protests here. Robert Evans would like to thank Yuliya Skatova for translating several hours worth of interviews, Alexey Karpovich for being an incredible photographer, and Alexander Marinich for helping him organize this.

Revisited: Five years on, what has Ukraine's Maidan Revolution achieved?

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